Wells in the Kurpark

Elisabethenbrunnen

Elisabethenbrunnen

The "well" of success: The quality of the water from Elisabethenbrunnen is so outstanding that it played a central role in the town's rise to become a world-renowned spa. To this day, it is still the most important mineral spring in Bad Homburg. Used in former times in salt production, it was filled up, before being rediscovered on June 27, 1834. The opinion of Justus von Liebig, a famous chemist: "It would be hard to find a mineral water in Germany with the same richness of active ingredients as the Elisabethenbrunnen in Homburg." The water from Elisabethenbrunnen, which is named after the wife of Landgrave Friedrich VI Joseph who was a member of the English royal family, is used to treat gastroenterological disorders. It always formed the focal point of social spa life. The temple covering the spring was designed by no less then Emperor Wilhelm II himself – right in the middle of the First World War. The statue of Hygeia, the Greek goddess of health, is seated inside the temple.

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Auguste-Viktoria-Brunnen

Auguste-Viktoria-Brunnen

Emperor Wilhelm II took up his drawing quill once more to bring to paper his ideas on how to make Homburg more lovely. In the spring of 1910, he personally sketched the temple for the spring that is named after his wife Auguste Viktoria. Heinrich Jacobi, architect and son of the great Homburg master builder Louis Jacobi, built the temple, which was completed one year later. Auguste-Viktoria-Brunnen is used to treat gastroenterological disorders.

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Landgrafenbrunnen

Landgrafenbrunnen

The spring with the highest salt content and one of the youngest in Bad Homburg. It was discovered in 1899 and was initially used for therapeutic baths and, from 1903 onwards, as healing water that was drunk to treat liver and gall bladder illnesses. The art nouveau monument that was created in 1908 was once adorned by a naked nymph in front of a well springing from the rocks. In prude post-war years, however, she was deemed to be too true-to-life and was replaced in 1955 by a bronze relief bust of Landgrave Friedrich II, after whom the spring is named.

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Louisenbrunnen

It used to be known as the "sulfur spring", which is the term still used in the vernacular. The name says it all. The water does not smell and taste particularly nice, but from 1856/57 onwards it was very popular for treating cardiovascular diseases. As time passed, however, it was deemed "undrinkable for the European palate" and is nowadays only drunk by a few die-hards. The mineral spring was given the more melodic name of Louise, after the wife of Landgrave Gustav.

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Stahlbrunnen

Stahlbrunnen

Nomen est omen – the "steel spring" is rich in low-carbonic iron. So rich, that Justus von Liebig, the famous chemist from Giessen, was quite overcome in 1841: "I cannot wait to let you know the result. The iron content is far higher than I expected, a pound (consisting of 16 ounces) contains all of 0.758 grams ... I view this as extremely fortunate for Homburg." The mineral spring was redesigned in the mid-1960s. It has toning properties and is used to treat anemia.

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Kaiserbrunnen

Kaiserbrunnen

Even the Romans knew about this spring – drinking bowls and the remains of a Roman bath were discovered close by – which was used for salt production in a salt works that was set up around 1700. When its healing powers were rediscovered in the mid-19th century, it was called "Der Sprudel" because the water was extraordinarily fizzy, a property that can still be seen beneath the glass cover to this day. Kaiserbrunnen has, however, had to be rebored several times already. As such, it is now 191 meters deep instead of the original 56 meters. The acidulous sodium chloride water is used for both bathing and drinking.

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Ludwigsbrunnen

Situated in the most secretive corner of the Kurpark, this mineral spring plays a special role in Bad Homburg's spa fortunes: It was the first spring to be rediscovered. Two boys swimming in the stream found it in 1809. Roman finds were uncovered when work started on it. Soon thereafter, the water from Ludwigsbrunnen was dispatched in jugs for advertising purposes. The water was and still is acidulous with a pleasant taste, low mineral content, and rich in carbonic acid. The enclosure of Ludwigsbrunnen has been altered several times. The cast-iron grating originates from 1835, a cozy grotto, of which the remains are still visible, was built in 1871.

Solesprudel

Like bathing in champagne – the salt water from the Solesprudel produces a tingling, refreshing feeling, but has also proven to be extremely successful in treating dermatological disorders, such as psoriasis and neurodermatitis. It was only used for external application because of its iron and carbonic acid content, and was therefore not graced with a lovely temple. The spring was bored back at the beginning of the 1850s but was then neglected. Not until Kaiser-Wilhelms-Bad was built did the town want to use it again for healing baths. Professor Steiner from Prague, who was consulted on the matter, found the old drill hole in 1899. It was still in usable condition down to a depth of 260 meters. Since being rebored at the beginning of the 1960s, the Solesprudel now reaches 305 meters deep into the ground.