Monuments

Bircher-Benner bust

Doubtless, everyone has heard of Bircher muesli. It is named after the "father of modern nutritional research", Dr. Maximilian Oskar Bircher-Benner (1867-1939). The Swiss physician was not directly linked to Bad Homburg, but the Society for Health Culture, which was based in the town, was a fervent admirer of the "muesli doctor". In 1965, it donated the bust, created by Frankfurt-based sculptor Georg Krämer – as the first Bircher-Benner monument in Germany.

Hölderlin monument

Hölderlin monument

It was his unrequited love for Susette Gontard, the wife of a Frankfurt banker, that first brought Friedrich Hölderlin (1770-1843) to Homburg. He came back a second time as his physical condition increasingly deteriorated. Some of the great romantic poet's best-known works were written in Homburg. In commemoration of his two stays, from 1798 - 1800 and from 1804 - 1806, the local historic society – the Verein für Geschichte und Altertumskunde – donated the Hölderlin monument in 1883. It is the second oldest of its kind in Germany. The great Homburg master builder Louis Jacobi designed the monument in red sandstone, the white marble relief of Hölderlin was created by sculptor Jacob May. Since 1983, Bad Homburg has been presenting a literary prize named after, and in honor of, Friedrich Hölderlin. Some of the best-known German-language authors are among the prizewinners.

Lenné monument

Lenné monument

His peers, rather disrespectfully, called him "Buddel-Peter" – Peter the Digger – because of the enormously large number of gardens and parks that Peter Joseph Lenné (1789-1866) created. As Royal Prussian Garden Director-General, he was mainly active in the Berlin-Brandenburg and Potsdam area, but he also created the Kurpark in Homburg. The brilliant landscape architect visited the aspiring spa town several times and, in 1854, the central core of the park was completed. Subsequent horticultural experts extended the park in line with his plans. The monument at the entrance to the Kurpark on Kaiser-Friedrich-Promenade was created in 1982 by Otto Weber-Hartl, a replacement for the copy of the bust that Christian Daniel Rauch had created for the Sanssouci park around 1850. A thief seemed to have fallen in love with the reproduction.

Agnon monument

Agnon monument

Samuel Joseph Agnon (1888-1970) is regarded as the master of modern Hebrew prose, and was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1966, together with Nelly Sachs. Agnon and his wife lived in Bad Homburg at "Haus Imperial" on Kaiser-Friedrich-Promenade between 1921 and 1924, where they fostered a circle of Jewish intellectuals from eastern Europe. The monument by Dina Kunze was inaugurated in 1993. It does not show Agnon himself; instead it pays tribute to his writing prowess. The bronze plates represent a roll of scripture. It is engraved in Hebrew and German with the dates of his birth and death, and features an excerpt from the speech he made when accepting the Nobel Prize in Literature.

Emperor Wilhelm I monument

Emperor Wilhelm I monument

The town dedicated the monument in front of Kaiser-Wilhelms-Bad, which is also named after him, "to the great Emperor, with love and thanks" in 1905. Wilhelm I was a frequent visitor to Homburg. The 3.50 meter bronze statue on its three meter plinth made of Swedish red granite shows His Majesty in his General's uniform with an ermine coat draped around him. His grandson, Emperor Wilhelm II, and his family came to the unveiling ceremony, which was also attended by royals, generals with their entourages, ambassadors, and town dignitaries. The artist Fritz Gerth was awarded a medal by the Emperor, while the Homburg mayor was elevated to the title of lord mayor.

Emperor Wilhelm II monument

Wilhelm II, who set up one of his summer residences in the Landgraves' Castle, celebrated his 25th jubilee in 1913, and was honored by the people of Bad Homburg with the creation of the Jubiläumspark and a monument on the edge of the park. It was paid for from donations by the bourgeoisie. On the two meter mottled sandstone block is a detailed inscription explaining the occasion and creation of the monument. It was originally topped by a medallion featuring a relief image of Wilhelm II, but this was removed in 1920. Bad Homburg-based sculptress Ortrud Krüger-Stohlmann created a new bronze relief in 1981, which depicts the last German emperor in profile.

Landgraves’ monument

Landgraves’ monument

Emperor Wilhelm II donated this monument in honor of the dynasty of the Hessen-Homburg Landgraves who had controlled the destiny of Homburg between 1622 and 1866. He financed the monument, decided where it should stand, next to Elisabethenbrunnen, chose the design, and gave a speech at its inauguration in August 1906. The front of the monument, which was created by Fritz Gerth, depicts the first important Landgrave, Friedrich II (1633-1708) – Kleist's "Prince of Homburg" – while the last Landgrave, Ferdinand, is shown on the back. His death in 1866 marked the demise of the male line of the dynasty. The names of all Hessen-Homburg Landgraves are listed on the two sides of the obelisk. The bronze ensemble of standard, oak leaf and coat of arms that lies on the steps bears witness to the military careers of the Landgraves, who nearly all served under other powers.

Monuments at Schmuckplatz

Monuments at Schmuckplatz

Friedrich III died in 1888, having ruled for just 99 days. Just like his predecessor and successor to the Imperial Throne – the two Wilhelms – he enjoyed coming to Homburg, and he and his wife Victoria were frequent visitors, even while he was still Crown Prince. The sovereign couple were extremely popular among the bourgeoisie, which they demonstrated by collecting donations after his death and erecting a monument in their honor. The monument was unveiled in May 1892 on Schmuckplatz on Kaiser-Friedrich-Promenade in the presence of his widow, who was called the Empress Friedrich. Ten years later, on the first anniversary of the death of Empress Friedrich, her effigy was added,  and the two larger-than-life busts of the Imperial couple, which were created by the well-known Berlin-based sculptor Prof. Joseph Uphues from brilliant white marble, now stand face to face on high granite plinths.

Hasensteine (hare stones)

The stone at the Thai-Sala in the park is as small as a hare. It marks the point where just such an animal died. On a day in July 1736. Shot by Landgrave Friedrich III Jacob at a distance of 300 paces, which is about 250 meters. Back then, that was a masterstroke. Or just plain lucky. The second "hare stone" marks the point where the Landgrave stood, close to the Samariterbrunnen. This is where the lodge of the Homburg shooting club used to stand. The "hare stones" (Hasensteine) are the oldest monument in Bad Homburg.

Brunnenmädchen (well girl)

The well girl is dedicated to all those who serve and without whom it would not be possible to operate as a spa. Well girls were employed between 1837 and 1939 to draw the water from the mineral springs and serve it to the spa guests. They were also responsible for ensuring that the residents of Homburg did not fill more than the permitted quantum of the healing water into bottles and jugs. The sculptor Prof. Richard Hess (born in 1937) gave his work the form of a carefree, happy girl who is cheekily adjusting her garter. The sculpture was created in 1994 and financed through donations in a campaign initiated by Galerie Michael Blaszczyk together with what was then the local newspaper, Taunus-Kurier.

80s monument

80s monument

The "Eighties" were the soldiers of the 80th Fusilier Regiment of Gersdorff, who were stationed in the town between 1871 and 1918. They acted as the military and patriotic backdrop for official events, such as the arrivals of the Imperial family in Homburg, or the unveiling of monuments – a function that was indispensable back then. The monument featuring the lion defending the flag in spite of his injuries commemorates the "Eighties" war victims, and was created in 1926.

Samariterbrunnen

Samariterbrunnen

Samariterbrunnen is a memorial to the "Samaritans" who selflessly helped others during the First World War from 1914 to 1918. It depicts a warrior in Roman uniform lying on the ground while an old woman from Samaria dressed in a toga offers him a refreshing drink in a helmet. A Bad Homburg burgher and his wife donated the cenotaph with its larger-than-life figures in 1920; it was created by Prof. Hugo Kaufmann, a sculptor from Berlin.

Durstbrunnen

Durstbrunnen

A female figure sitting with her legs crossed, holding a bowl in her raised hands, with water flowing over the edge of the bowl into a basin at her feet. Beside her, two black bronze panthers reaching up to the bowl: Berlin-based sculptor Hans Dammann entered his work "Durst" (thirst) in a major art exhibition that was hosted in his home town in 1910. The former District Councilor Helmut von Brüning, who lived in Bad Homburg, purchased the sculpture in 1914 in order to gift it to the town for the new Jubiläumspark. Since the park was dedicated to the 25th jubilee of Wilhelm II, the Emperor was, of course, allowed a say in the matter. He was so delighted by the Durstbrunnen that he conferred the title of Professor on Hans Dammann. The bronze panthers had to be melted down in the Second World War. Frankfurt sculptor Ramon Bartholomä created new effigies of the animals in 1979.